Striking a Balance in Daily Life

Balancing Recovery

For most of us who are new to recovery, balance can be a very unfamiliar thing — so much so that we may even be resistant to it. A life lived in active alcoholism or drug addiction rarely has any semblance of balance, moderation, or peace. Most of us jumped between extremes in our disease, always pushing the limits. When we get sober, we may still feel the urge to seek out extremes wherever we can. We revel in emotional highs or wallow in dramatic lows. Most of us don’t seek out balance, or even like the thought of achieving balance. We may not have experienced much balance in our lives while we were drinking or using, but it can certainly benefit our lives now. What Balance Means in Recovery Seeking balance in recovery doesn’t mean that we stop feeling joy or sorrow. It doesn’t mean that we stop having…

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How Can I Stay Safe During Summer Parties?

How Can I Stay Safe During Summer Parties?

Most alcoholics and addicts fear that when they enter recovery, the fun stops. That simply isn’t true. The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous says “we are not a glum lot… we absolutely insist on enjoying life.” It also says that we “can go anywhere on this earth where other free men may go without disaster, provided [we] remain willing to maintain a certain simple attitude.” That attitude is to keep in our minds the principles we learn in the 12-Steps of recovery. We insist on having fun, and we can go places freely as long as we keep our minds on the foundations of recovery. Social events increase during certain times of the year, like the holidays – and now summertime is upon us. There are pool parties, vacations, and social gatherings galore. So it might be helpful to remember a few simple things to stay safe and help maintain…

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Fully Immerse Yourself in Recovery

Fully Immerse

Recovery and meaningful sobriety are not processes that happen in isolation. A facility like Jaywalker Lodge is likely the place where an alcoholic and/or addict is introduced to recovery, but the activities, tools, processes, and healing therapies they learn should not be left there. If the recovery process is begun but then left behind, it is highly likely that the one who sought sobriety will have to come seeking it again. It is important to understand that recovery is not a punishment for addiction or a treatment like antibiotics. Recovery is the gift of a chance to live life fully, happily, and freely – and it is most effective when the addict is fully immersed in all it has to offer. A Daily Choice We shouldn’t take a daily multivitamin just every so often, or when we aren’t feeling so great. If we do, those helpful vitamins – while still…

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Experience, Strength, & Hope

Hello everyone my name is Stuart.  I am a alcoholic/addict in recovery.  A little about myself I grew up in a very small rural town in Montana. My early childhood was very stable and had a loving home to grow up with my brother in. At seven years old things took a drastic turn for the worst. I suffered a severe and nearly life ending leg injury in a Go-cart accident. I won’t go into detail because it is very graphic.  I was rushed to the hospital in Bozeman MT, where it was decided immediately that in hopes to save my leg I needed to be taken to an advanced surgical center. I was taken by life flight to Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City, UT. I was hospitalized there 1.5 months there requiring massive amounts of surgeries to be able to save my leg from being fully amputated.  I was…

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Life on Two Wheels

Looking back at my past, I have always had a fascination for motorcycles and life on two wheels. My pops has been riding motorcycles ever since he was a teenager and would tell me stories of all the joy and dangers of riding. He was very wise to explain the differences of dirt riding and road riding. At a young age I learned how much joy motorcycling could bring me as long as I learned how to ride safely. He shared his knowledge and experience with me as to how he has been able to enjoy riding most of his life. When I was ten years old, my pops took me on a week long road trip to New Mexico from California. We trailered three motorcycles with us. His cruiser, his dirt bike, and a child sized dirt bike that we had borrowed for me to ride. I thought I…

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A Decade Sober

Pat Celebrates 10 years! Pat is the Chief of Admissions and Marketing at Jaywalker, but more importantly an alum. Pat enjoys snowboarding, hunting, mountain biking, cycling, and hanging out with his wife and dog. To celebrate his ten years, Pat went on a 100 mile bike ride around the Roaring Fork Valley.  Pat has been a true example of what is possible for an alumni of Jaywalker. He lives a life full of happiness and joy that is grounded in a program of recovery. He lives by the principles and always is giving back to the people around him. He continues to be a pillar in the Jaywalker community and we are that much stronger for having him in it. Thanks for all you do, Pat! Congratulations on ten!

Which Came First: The Chicken or the Surfboard?

For the seventh day in a row I’m driving down the same dirt road to reach the beach; surfboards on top of the car, anticipation running high.  As I came around a corner, standing in the road was the same rooster that I had seen the 6 days previous.  The exact same spot, same time of day, 6 days straight. I thought to myself, “there is that stupid rooster, standing in the middle of the road, doing the same thing as each day before. Doesn’t he have anything better to do?”   Then it dawned on me, maybe the rooster was thinking the same thing about me, “there is that same guy, driving the same car, with the same boards on top for as many days as my little chicken brain can remember.” Yeah, I had that actual conversation going in my head.  Maybe I was suffering from too much tropical sun or too…

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2019 Shrine Hut Adventure

In late January of 2019 Jaywalker Lodge clients embarked on the winter Hut trip.  I had high hopes that the clients would be able to strengthen their group ties, foster willingness to work collectively, be vulnerable with each other, and have fun sober.  We left the comfy confines of the Lodge and were greeted with strong winds, frigid temperatures, and gray skies at the Vail Summit. We quickly strapped snowshoes to our feet, threw 35-40lb bags on our backs, and a few generous clients strapped 50lb. supply sleds to their waste.   Simultaneously, 13 dudes experienced something new…backcountry winter at 11,000 feet.  It felt awkward, difficult, foreign, and exciting.  The illusion of control was instantaneously stripped from us.  We formed a single file line and ploughed a trail into the backcountry with goal of reaching the hut.  It took nearly two hours of team work to arrive at our destination.  The feelings of joy and relief were palpable.  We made…

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Jaywalker receives Volunteer of the Year award from Independence Pass Foundation

Service to others is an important part of the treatment model Jaywalker provides. Through this we begin to learn that there are things far greater than ourselves. As a member of the Jaywalker community I am provided many service opportunities that include helping at Mission Wolf, planting trees for the City of Carbondale, and hurricane relief in Houston. Independence Pass Foundation provides yet another unique service opportunity for our guys. The IPF is a group that is dedicated to the restoration of the Independence Pass corridor and the surrounding wilderness. Please Click Here for the full article and for information on The Independence Pass Foundation.

Jaywalker Lodge Outpatient Program – Moab Expeditions

Jaywalker Lodge Outpatient Program – Moab Expeditions From the first time I rolled into Moab, Utah years ago as an Outpatient client, I remember feeling anundeniable sense of awe that I had never felt before in my life.  The colors of the orange sand and blue sky, the arid smell of desert air, and sounds of four-wheelers revving their engines had me feeling electric.  It was like I woke up in the middle of a John Wayne movie.  I sat in the car fantasizing about Indians, cowboys, bandits, uranium, and gun powder. Just 6 months prior to this trip I was back in Texas hopelessly addicted to crystal methamphetamine. I was homeless, buried in debt, and reaching new bottoms on a daily basis.  As I sat in the car in Moab, I felt grateful that I was no longer where I was, but I was still scared because I knew gratitude…

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