Tag: Recovery

Including Your Loved Ones in Your Recovery

Including Your Loved Ones in Your Recovery

Addiction is often referred to as the “family disease” because it affects the family dynamic in a way that seems almost irreparable. A loved one caught up in the thralls of substance use disorder (SUD) can cause trauma, resentment, and broken relationships among their immediate friends and family. After treatment, bad feelings and mistrust might still exist but know that your loved ones still care about you. Your support system is a vital part of recovery, and sometimes, the best way to fix those broken bonds is to include your loved ones in your care if they so wish to be. Thankfully, there are plenty of safe ways your loved ones can be included in your healing process. Strengthening Your Support System The people you keep in your life are valuable to your recovery. This holds especially true for your closest friends and family members who were there for you…

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Keeping Motivation After Your First Year of Recovery

Keeping Motivation After Your First Year of Recovery

Congratulations! You’ve made it through your first year of recovery! This is an important milestone you’ll never forget. You should feel proud making it this far. However, there is still work to be done. You might feel on the verge of burnout, or maybe you feel like celebrating this milestone responsibly. This is only the beginning. There’s still so much to look forward to after your first year of recovery. Don’t lose motivation now! This Is Only Just the Beginning An entire year has passed, and you’re ready to grab your chip at your next 12-Step meeting. You might feel on top of the world, and you should. The first year is an important milestone in the recovery process. The first year is truly the hardest because your body, mind, and spirit are still adjusting to sobriety. It’s advised to take it easy during your first year while you build…

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Single Dad in Recovery: How Do I Cope?

father holding his daughter on the doorstep

Being a single dad comes with its own hardships, but raising children while in recovery can be a completely different challenge. What are some ways you can maintain your recovery while still showing up for your kids? Getting Better for Them Early recovery can be challenging, especially if you have children. It can become even more difficult if you are the sole caretaker. However, the love you have for your children should work as your motivation to get better and stay better. Your children love you and care about you. Focus on the love you feel for your children to keep you on track in your recovery. Tackle Your Legal Issues Many parents dealing with substance use issues might have legal problems related to their addiction. It’s common for parents who have been arrested for using substances to lose custody of their children. After treatment, it should be a priority…

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Maintaining Your Boundaries During Recovery

man making a stop hand gesture

With the holidays around the corner, you’re bound to be bombarded with questions and expectations. Your extended family might ask inappropriate questions about your treatment. Your friends might ask you to attend parties where substances are present. Your loved ones might ask you to give up valuable time in favor of holiday shenanigans. This all might come with a whole lot of stress and discomfort. What can you do to keep your boundaries intact while dealing with family and friends who expect you to “play nice” even at your own expense? Knowing When to Say No In early recovery, it’s a good idea to have a healthy and accurate understanding of your limits and boundaries. In treatment, you might learn the basics of forming boundaries, but practicing it with people you care about might still feel new and scary. It takes time to build up the confidence and positive self-image…

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Benefits of Clean Eating During Recovery

cereal, milk and strawberry jam on white ceramic bowl

Recovering from addiction doesn’t only mean recovering from substance use. It also includes recovering from a previous lifestyle. During your client’s addiction, chances are they didn’t take care of their body. They might not have eaten foods that were good for them, and they probably weren’t overly concerned with a balanced diet. However, many substances can damage our bodies and deprive us of essential nutrients. Throughout the recovery journey, the mind needs to heal, as well as the body. One of the most critical steps to take is changing what is put into an individual’s body. What is Clean Eating In its simplest form, clean eating is all about eating high-quality, nutrient-rich, whole foods. This means avoiding foods that are highly processed and devoid of nutritional value. These include fruits, vegetables, proteins, and healthy carbohydrates that add something meaningful to the body. When eating these foods, it can be beneficial…

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Relationships and Recovery: Choosing Yourself, Choosing Your Partner

a couple in love sits and watches the sunset

While in active addiction, the choices and decisions on how we spend our time, money, and efforts are all hinged on our drug of choice. As we enter recovery, it can be difficult to learn how to be an attentive partner and a caring friend. Since we have spent years and years catering only to our own psychological and physiological needs, we must practice new habits in order to become better friends and partners. Identify Supportive Relationships Recovery impacts your relationships in a big way. Treatment allows you to take stock of your relationships and how they are serving you. During this time, you will begin to create your support system, which will be essential to your sobriety. You might already have supportive people in your life. There might have already been people who asked you to seek help. There might have been people who have had your back when…

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Relationships and Recovery: Maintaining Sobriety After a Breakup

young woman looking to the side with a sad face

Breakups can be devastating for anyone. For those who struggle with a substance use disorder, maintaining sobriety after a relationship ends can be a major challenge. Intense emotions such as jealousy, insecurity, and uncertainty can all be potential triggers. However, it’s very important that we do not give in to the negative emotions that are often associated with bad breakups and resort to alcohol or drugs to numb our pain.  The “Splitting-Up” Spiral and Sobriety  What could I have done differently? They were the one; what happened? How can I ever move on from this? These are just some of the many questions that we may find ourselves asking after a breakup. Whether the breakup was mutual and amicable or not, this negative loop of emotions and questions can persist for days, months, and sometimes even years.  According to marriage and family therapist Courtney Geter, “The negative thoughts that breakups…

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Battling Boredom During Recovery

Young man chatting on the phone

For those of us who associated “fun” with substance use for many years, boredom can be a leading cause of relapse, struggles, and anxiety. In order to cope with this, it is imperative that we restructure our idea of “fun” by building new hobbies and spending time with ourselves without drugs and alcohol. Sober Stimulation  When we leave the structured life of a treatment program and return home with a commitment to sobriety, we are suddenly forced to deal with the monotony of day-to-day life with a clear mind. This can be especially difficult when we are dealing with “boredom” while in recovery. This is why so many programs and addiction experts recommend finding hobbies and activities that we can invest our time and effort in. During active addiction, we try to control our emotions with substances. We avoid discomfort by using. Boredom can be a very uncomfortable emotion, and…

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Why Mental Health Is a Top Priority in Recovery

Years of substance use affect your body in more ways than you can imagine. But the side effects are not just limited to your physical health – they extend to your mental health as well. Physically, addiction to alcohol or drugs can have a negative impact on your heart, liver, kidneys, mouth, liver, throat, and more. Sometimes it’s easier to recognize the physical symptoms of addiction. What often goes unnoticed for years is the negative impact that addiction has on our mind, including our emotional and psychological well-being. These changes in our mental health are gradually revealed in our behavior, tone, how we communicate, social anxieties, and more. The short-term euphoria or relaxation that one derives from alcohol or drug intake is eventually overpowered by the long-term mental health issues suffered later in life. Isolation, disconnection from family and friends, and performance issues at work are just some of the…

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Don’t Fight It, Face It!

We often find people trying hard to end the bad habits of addiction with great frustration, anger, and a sense of hopelessness. This is especially true after many years of habitual substance use and the negative mental health effects that come with it. A person can easily find themselves trapped in a mentally traumatic situation if they continuously try to fight their addiction with frustration, anger, and other harmful emotions. If you continue to fight your addiction daily like you’re in a war, chances are that you will lose. But if you start admitting your mistakes and face your addiction head-on, you’re much more likely to be victorious. Being strong-willed and determined to face your addiction by engaging in the right kind of recovery processes can lead to lasting recovery. Wondering how you can effectively face your addiction like a pro and beat it? Although there is no one-size-fits-all procedure…

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