Including Your Loved Ones in Your Recovery

Including Your Loved Ones in Your Recovery

Addiction is often referred to as the “family disease” because it affects the family dynamic in a way that seems almost irreparable. A loved one caught up in the thralls of substance use disorder (SUD) can cause trauma, resentment, and broken relationships among their immediate friends and family. After treatment, bad feelings and mistrust might still exist but know that your loved ones still care about you. Your support system is a vital part of recovery, and sometimes, the best way to fix those broken bonds is to include your loved ones in your care if they so wish to be. Thankfully, there are plenty of safe ways your loved ones can be included in your healing process. Strengthening Your Support System The people you keep in your life are valuable to your recovery. This holds especially true for your closest friends and family members who were there for you…

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Keeping Motivation After Your First Year of Recovery

Keeping Motivation After Your First Year of Recovery

Congratulations! You’ve made it through your first year of recovery! This is an important milestone you’ll never forget. You should feel proud making it this far. However, there is still work to be done. You might feel on the verge of burnout, or maybe you feel like celebrating this milestone responsibly. This is only the beginning. There’s still so much to look forward to after your first year of recovery. Don’t lose motivation now! This Is Only Just the Beginning An entire year has passed, and you’re ready to grab your chip at your next 12-Step meeting. You might feel on top of the world, and you should. The first year is an important milestone in the recovery process. The first year is truly the hardest because your body, mind, and spirit are still adjusting to sobriety. It’s advised to take it easy during your first year while you build…

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Single Dad in Recovery: How Do I Cope?

father holding his daughter on the doorstep

Being a single dad comes with its own hardships, but raising children while in recovery can be a completely different challenge. What are some ways you can maintain your recovery while still showing up for your kids? Getting Better for Them Early recovery can be challenging, especially if you have children. It can become even more difficult if you are the sole caretaker. However, the love you have for your children should work as your motivation to get better and stay better. Your children love you and care about you. Focus on the love you feel for your children to keep you on track in your recovery. Tackle Your Legal Issues Many parents dealing with substance use issues might have legal problems related to their addiction. It’s common for parents who have been arrested for using substances to lose custody of their children. After treatment, it should be a priority…

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How Do I Stay Sober During The Holidays?

portrait of a happy mother and daughter holding gingerbread cookies

The holiday season is filled with parties, stress, family drama, and potential isolation. Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, there are plenty of things that could cause relapse if a person in recovery isn’t careful. How can you have a safe holiday without endangering your sobriety? Dealing With Holiday Stress A major cause of relapse is stress. The holiday season is filled with stressful situations, whether or not this time of year brings you joy. Whether you’re stressed about family coming over or buying the perfect gift, it’s important to learn how to manage your stress levels during the holidays. A great way to combat stress is to stay grounded. Finding stability from breathwork or taking time out of your day to focus on yourself can allow you to destress instead of letting it build up. This time of year becomes busy whether you work in customer service, tourism, or…

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Maintaining Your Boundaries During Recovery

man making a stop hand gesture

With the holidays around the corner, you’re bound to be bombarded with questions and expectations. Your extended family might ask inappropriate questions about your treatment. Your friends might ask you to attend parties where substances are present. Your loved ones might ask you to give up valuable time in favor of holiday shenanigans. This all might come with a whole lot of stress and discomfort. What can you do to keep your boundaries intact while dealing with family and friends who expect you to “play nice” even at your own expense? Knowing When to Say No In early recovery, it’s a good idea to have a healthy and accurate understanding of your limits and boundaries. In treatment, you might learn the basics of forming boundaries, but practicing it with people you care about might still feel new and scary. It takes time to build up the confidence and positive self-image…

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Socializing Without Alcohol

a group of men sitting on a mountain

For some of us, alcohol makes us extroverted, fun, and the life of the party. People around us do not know we are struggling with a crippling addiction. As men, we may feel the need to mask our pain by essentially functioning as free entertainment for the party or patrons at a bar. Once we enter recovery, we may find that those traits do not represent our true self, which can be distressing. Learning that we are actually more introverted isn’t a bad thing, and it’s worth noting that alcohol may not have made us all that fun to be around (even if it seemed that way). Finding Your Sober Identity You might not know the type of person you are while sober, and if you do, you might not like them. So, you drink. It’s easier to handle yourself and how you feel around others when you drink. However,…

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Benefits of Clean Eating During Recovery

cereal, milk and strawberry jam on white ceramic bowl

Recovering from addiction doesn’t only mean recovering from substance use. It also includes recovering from a previous lifestyle. During your client’s addiction, chances are they didn’t take care of their body. They might not have eaten foods that were good for them, and they probably weren’t overly concerned with a balanced diet. However, many substances can damage our bodies and deprive us of essential nutrients. Throughout the recovery journey, the mind needs to heal, as well as the body. One of the most critical steps to take is changing what is put into an individual’s body. What is Clean Eating In its simplest form, clean eating is all about eating high-quality, nutrient-rich, whole foods. This means avoiding foods that are highly processed and devoid of nutritional value. These include fruits, vegetables, proteins, and healthy carbohydrates that add something meaningful to the body. When eating these foods, it can be beneficial…

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Relationships and Recovery: Choosing Yourself, Choosing Your Partner

a couple in love sits and watches the sunset

While in active addiction, the choices and decisions on how we spend our time, money, and efforts are all hinged on our drug of choice. As we enter recovery, it can be difficult to learn how to be an attentive partner and a caring friend. Since we have spent years and years catering only to our own psychological and physiological needs, we must practice new habits in order to become better friends and partners. Identify Supportive Relationships Recovery impacts your relationships in a big way. Treatment allows you to take stock of your relationships and how they are serving you. During this time, you will begin to create your support system, which will be essential to your sobriety. You might already have supportive people in your life. There might have already been people who asked you to seek help. There might have been people who have had your back when…

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The “Heavyweight” Drinker

elder man with a serious face

Everyone has a friend in their group that can put it away more than anyone else. Maybe you’re that friend! For many men, in many cultures around the globe, a high tolerance for alcohol is associated with masculinity, pride, and competitiveness, things that we as men commonly struggle with. However, the dangers of binge drinking are clear and present. High tolerance for copious amounts of alcohol is not a good thing. Dangers of Binge Drinking Anything in excess usually isn’t good, but there can be severe consequences for alcohol. It might seem harmless fun to participate or encourage this behavior, but real problems can erupt from a culture of binge drinking. The truth is that, after a while, a person who drinks in excess can develop alcohol dependence or addiction. These outcomes can destroy relationships, opportunities, and the health of a person who becomes addicted. While your behavior or your…

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How to Build Trust With Your Client

An upset young woman, sharing her problems with a counselor

Some clients are willing to be open in the first session, while others take a while to come out of their shells. Since addiction and mental health can impact a person’s ability to trust and be vulnerable, there are steps that professionals need to take to get a client to feel safe and comfortable. Building trust with your client isn’t just getting to know them but building a solid foundation and creating a space that feels safe and supportive. Here’s where to start. Building Rapport The process of getting a client to trust you starts with building a relationship with your client through earning their trust. A client might be afraid of becoming vulnerable in your sessions right away because, at first, they view you as a stranger. Over time, you’ll build that trust by creating a safe space for them while also showing that you can be counted on…

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